A Guide to Aquafaba

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Glass mixing bowl of aquafaba for our how to make aquafaba guide

If you’ve found this page you’re likely curious about aquafaba!

What is it?

  • It’s is the liquid leftover from cooked chickpeas. You can obtain it two ways:
    • 1) Drain a can of chickpeas and reserve the liquid. Or,
    • 2) Cook your own chickpeas and reserve the leftover cooking liquid. The second method is less reliable, in my opinion, because the aquafaba can be too thin and you may need to cook it down, making it more time consuming.
  • Beginners should rely on aquafaba from canned chickpeas for ease!

How do you whip it?

  • The trick to whipping aquafaba is using a hand or stand mixer! Whisking it by hand takes quite a long time and does not produce as good of results in my experience. I use this hand mixer and it works like a dream.
  • Whipping aquafaba generally takes 3-6 minutes to get to semi-firm peaks, depending on your equipment and how thick your aquafaba was to begin with. So take your time and don’t be discouraged if it takes some time to reach stiff peaks! It can require a little practice and patience.

Tips + Tricks?

  • My main tip? Buy canned chickpeas instead of making your own from cooked chickeas. My favorite brand is Trader Joe’s Organic Chickpeas.
  • My next tip is to throw in some cream of tartar, which causes the aquafaba to whip up much easier, faster, and makes the peaks firmer. See it at work in this VIDEO!

How to Use It?

Aquafaba can be used in a number of ways:

Jar of homemade mayonnaise made with aquafaba

Recipes!

Vegan Mayo
Best Vegan Gluten-Free Sugar Cookies
1-Bowl Ginger Cookies
Peanut Butter Cup Cookies (V/GF)
Best Vegan Gluten-Free Waffles
Best Vegan Gluten-Free Cornbread
1-Bowl Vegan Pumpkin Roll (GF)
1-Bowl Pumpkin Cake (V/GF)
Best Almond Meal Chocolate Chip Cookies (V/GF)
30-Minute Baked Vegan Chocolate Donuts (GF)

Because aquafaba is such a recent discovery – only in the last few years – there are tons of uses that are yet to be explored! So be creative, use these methods and recipes as a starter guide, and go from there!

If you discover new creations, share them down below in the comments! And be sure to tag your aquafaba creations #minimalistbaker on Instagram so we can see. Cheers, friends!

Stirring aquafaba into brownie batter as a delicious egg-free substitute

How to Make Aquafaba

A step-by-step guide to aquafaba! What is it? How do you whip it? How do you use it? What recipes can I use it in? All of your questions are answered here!
Author Minimalist Baker
Print
Showing freshly whipped peaks of aquafaba in a bowl
4.58 from 28 votes
Prep Time 6 minutes
Total Time 6 minutes
Servings 1 (~2 cups whipped)
Course Egg Replacer
Cuisine Gluten-Free, Vegan
Freezer Friendly No
Does it keep? 2-3 Days

Ingredients

  • 1 15-ounce can chickpeas (drained LIQUID RESERVED- that’s the aquafaba // beans set aside for another use)
  • 1/8 tsp cream of tartar (optional // the trick to a better whip!)

Instructions

  • Drain your chickpeas and reserve the liquid – then you have aquafaba! Place in a large mixing bowl to whip!
  • The trick to whipping aquafaba is using a hand or stand mixer! Whisking it by hand takes quite a long time and does not produce as good of results. Another trick is to throw in 1/8-1/4 tsp cream of tartar, which causes the aquafaba to whip up much easier, faster, and makes the peaks firmer.
  • Whip your aquafaba to desired thickness. It generally requires 3-6 minutes to get to semi-firm peaks, depending on your equipment and how thick your aquafaba was to begin with. So take your time and don’t be discouraged if it takes some time to reach stiff peaks.
  • Aquafaba can be used in a number of ways: 1) It can be added to recipes UNWHIPPED as an egg binder, such as in these Vegan Gluten Free Sugar Cookies. 2) It can be whipped into semi-soft peaks and added to recipes as a whipped egg white substitute, such as these Vegan Gluten Free Waffles! 3) It can be whipped into stiff peaks and made into things like Easy Vegan Macaroons and meringues (recipe to come!). It can also be used to make Vegan Mayo!
  • Because aquafaba is such a recent discovery – only in the last few years – there are tons of uses that are yet to be explored yet! So be creative, use these methods and recipes as a starter guide, and go from there! If you discover new creations, share them down below in the comments!

Video

Notes

*Aquafaba was certainly not my discovery, only one that I have learned about and enjoyed exploring on my own. For more information, there is a whole website devoted to the origins of aquafaba and its uses!
*1 15-ounce (425 g) can of chickpeas typically yields about 1/2 cup (120 ml) aquafaba, which typically whips up into ~2-3 cups aquafaba.
*Nutrition information represents one 15-ounce can worth of aquafaba, which has minimal calories.

Nutrition (1 of 1 servings)

Serving: 1 serving Calories: 15 Carbohydrates: 3 g Protein: 0.8 g Fat: 0.2 g Saturated Fat: 0 g Polyunsaturated Fat: 0 g Monounsaturated Fat: 0 g Trans Fat: 0 g Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 2.7 mg Potassium: 59 mg Fiber: 0 g Sugar: 1 g Vitamin A: 0 IU Vitamin C: 0 mg Calcium: 5.87 mg Iron: 0.41 mg

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    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Tracey, we haven’t tried it but to our knowledge the liquid from chickpeas is unique and other beans don’t create the same results. Hope this helps!

  1. Melinda says

    I made a lemon “pudding” and used monkfruit as the sweetener. 15 calories and it satisfied my sweet tooth. And I wonder if it could be frozen for a frozen treat

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      We’re so glad you enjoyed it, Melinda! We think the texture would change with freezing, but let us know if you try it!

  2. Joseph Banchik says

    I’m a meat eater, but I wanted to use this for a mousse. How much sugar would I need to add and how far in advance could I make this without the aquafaba deflating?

  3. Octavia says

    I need the aquafaba to have a minimum shelf life of 14 days. If I add apples cider vinegar and lemon juice to the whipped aquafaba, will I get 14 days shelf life?

    Thank you,
    Octavia

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hm, we’re not sure! You could freeze the chickpea brine to keep for longer.

  4. Tav says

    I was hoping to find a way to make aquafaba from scratch, but this recipe effectively is to take a can of chickpeas and use the pre-made aquafaba

  5. Ellie says

    Hi there!
    I’m looking for a substitute for 3 egg whites for a cupcake recipe. The egg whites are whipped and then incorporated inside the batter so ground flaxseed won’t work but looks like this might!

    What is the measurably quantity of the aquafaba that I need to replace the 3 egg whites? Do I need to whip them before incorporating them in the batter as well?
    Please reply soon as I’m going to make the cupcakes this weekend. Thanks

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Ellie, 3 eggs would be ~9 Tbsp or a little over 1/2 cup aquafaba. We would suggest whipping the aquafaba if the recipe calls for whipped egg whites. Hope that helps! Let us know how it turns out =)

      • Ellie says

        Thank you! It worked!! I whipped the liquid and then incorporated it in the batter. I actually didn’t measure the amount of the liquid, I put the whole thing in 😂 so I guess it added up to being the amount needed? :)

  6. Margaret De Luca says

    I substituted Aquafaba for eggs in Banana Bread because my grandson is allergic to eggs, actually he has an anaphylactic reaction to eggs. It worked really well.
    Don’t whip it just mix it in.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hmm, we’re not sure! Since it’s usually such an egg-heavy recipe, we think it might be difficult. Let us know if you try it!

    • John says

      I’ve tried it in angelfood cake twice. The sponge turns out deflated and does not survive inversion. It makes the saddest mess.

  7. Barbara says

    Hi! I used the chickpea water after cooking chickpeas in my Instapot as an egg substitute. It worked great. I think you need less water when cooking the beans in the Instapot, so there is no need to cook it down or buy the beans in a can.

    My daughter is a vegan and I really wanted to make Vermont Johnnycake from my 1965 Ceresota (Heckers) Flour bread book. I used one cup WW Flour, 1 cup unbleached, 1 cup Cornmeal. I used almond milk for the milk, a bit more than 1/2 cup of the chick pea water for the 3 eggs, and 1/4 cup melted (and slightly browned) oat butter and 1/2 cup sunflower oil for the 3/4 c melted shortening. It was light, yummy, and fabulous! Thank you for the help.

  8. farragio says

    I’m looking for a substitute for heavy whipping cream for my coffee and was curious if aquafaba would be a viable option? How long does it keep in the fridge?

  9. Tom Shea says

    Aquafaba granola turned out great ! I wonder though about the chic pea liquid from the can, doesn’t that cause the “gassy” effect ? Does whipping it nullify the effect ?

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Tom, if you’re sensitive to certain types of carbohydrates or have digestive issues, that could be an issue. But otherwise, it should be fine!

        • Bernadette Simoneau says

          Hello
          How much do I need to have 3 eggs worth and which I need to mix with sugar – is this possible ?

          Thanks for your help
          Bernadette

          PS LOVE all your recipes and you e changed the vegan-GF life for better ❤️🙏

          • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

            Hi Bernadette, 3 eggs would be ~9 Tbsp or a little over 1/2 cup aquafaba. Hope that helps!

      • Jenny says

        I’ve tried to sub this in waffles and your grain-free pancakes recipes, and it’s failed. Both times, the pancake/waffle ended up burning easily and not cooking through. Any ideas why? How critical is the cream of tartar? I haven’t been adding that.

        • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

          Cream of tartar isn’t crucial for cooking, only for texture / rise if making something like meringues. Did you try this recipe by chance? It’s our favorite V / GF waffles with whipped aquafaba.

        • Vicki says

          Any tips for af that won’t whip up?
          I tried to whip my first can tonight and it was so fluffy, tried the 2nd and 3rd can and nothing, we’re they too watery maybe? It was the same brand and same sz can, baffles me!

          • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

            Hm, yes, it does sound like the brand could be the issue, assuming you are using a hand mixer? Have you tried adding a little bit of cream of tartar? That can help it thicken.

          • Vicki says

            I used a stand mixer, added a bunch of cream of tartar, got it so-so, I’ll have to buy a different brand and get better results

  10. DocSiders says

    Folded this whipped aquafaba into a cashew based vegan (relatively low fat) mayonnaise.

    Best vegan mayo texture ever… and the new flavor was a good surprise.

    Don’t know how long it lasts because the first 3 batches didn’t last more than 2 days (so at least 3 days).

  11. Joey @ The Artist Journal says

    Is this recipes safe?

    As confirmed by research, the presence of saponins is responsible for the egg white-like foaming effect from whipping chickpea water & Saponins are a class of chemicals present in legumes in significant amounts…

    Saponins are a toxic steroid derivative that disrupts red blood cells. They should be avoided during pregnancy as consumption can induce a miscarriage by stimulating uterine blood flow. They also contribute to the development of leaky gut over time by damaging the gut wall.

        • Matt A. says

          Hi Joey,

          That article from Healthy Home Economist is not well-researched. The scholarly articles cited by the author actually don’t support the position of the article. Just because something ‘sounds bad’ doesn’t mean that it actually is. For example, cytotoxicity:

          “ Cytotoxicity and the chemopreventive role of saponins was also discussed in a number of review papers (Rao and Sung 1995; Konoshima 1996; Shibata 2001; Kerwin 2004; Kim 2008; Bachran et al. 2008; Fuchs et al. 2009). While most of these focus on triterpenoids, and especially on ginseng and soy saponins, chemopreventive and cancer control activity of a steroidal sapogenin—diosgenin has been recently summarized (Raju and Mehta 2009). Cytotoxicity of dioscins was also discussed in a review on bioactive steroid saponins from the Dioscorea genus (Sautour and Mitaine-Offer 2007). Bachran et al. (Bachran et al. 2008) in their review of saponins playing a role in tumor therapy focused on certain groups of compounds, such as dioscins, saikosaponins, julibrosides, avicins, soy and ginseng saponins, and on combinations of saponins and conventional anti-tumorigenic drugs… The study by Zhang et al. was well designed also in another aspect, because the major drawback of cytotoxicity tests summarized in this review, is that only few compare the effect on cancer cells with the effect on normal cells… While all the four compounds exhibited significant cytotoxicity against cancer cells (IC50 2.57–12.20 μmol l−1) they did not affect the growth of primary cultured human astrocytes at concentrations as high as >100 μmol l−1 ”
          (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2928447/)

          Additionally, the URL provided by Minimalist Baker includes an icon that clearly says “full text links”, if you click on that it directs you to the full text of the research. In case you find that difficult:
          https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/10.1089/109662004322984734?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%20%200pubmed

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Ann, Generally we recommend 3 Tbsp per 1 small egg, or 1/4 cup per medium egg. I’d start with 3 Tbsp and add 1 Tbsp at a time more as needed to moisten.

      • Lori says

        Just a quick question to clarify: would it be 1/3 cup of the whipped aquafaba for 1 medium egg or is the 1/3 talking about before it’s whipped and then you use the whole whipped amount? Thank you.

        • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

          Hi Lori, we’re not sure where 1/3 is coming from? Perhaps you mean 3 Tbsp? If so, that’s before whipping. Hope that helps!

          • Emma says

            Can you store the aquafaba that you have drained from a can for later use? And if yes, how and for how long?

          • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

            Yes! It should last at least 2-3 days, or maybe up to 1 week? Other readers have also mentioned that it can be frozen, but we haven’t tried that.

    • Lori says

      Hello!! I make aquafaba often its wonderful whipped and used as meringue my only issue I add occasionally is when I make pavlova or cookies with it it often times collapses not always but often !!! Not sure if there is away to keep it more stable!! I do use cream of tartar!!! Any suggestions ?? ♥️

  12. ss says

    Hi there,
    I really need some help, I’d like to use aquafaba as an egg white replacement for a cake, the recipe excerpt is below:
    “Using a handheld or stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, beat the butter and sugar together on high speed until smooth and creamed, about 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides and up the bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. Beat in the egg whites on high speed until combined, about 2 minutes. ” If the recipe doesn’t call for whipping the egg whites, do I just pour the aquafaba in? or should I whisk it a little bit without cream of tarter to get it foamy? Please any help would be much appreciated!!!

  13. Stephanie says

    Hello, I made this and played around and it turned out great. I had UNICO brand Chickpea cans which are 19oz. I made 2 cans as I wanted to have more and freeze it. I added 3 x 1/4 teaspoons tartart and I also added some stevia, some cane sugar, vanilla and artificial almond flavouring. I didn’t measure so I am sorry about that but it smells delicious and tastes good. My daughter is GF, dairy and egg free, nut allergy, but my son who is a harsh food critic tasted it and said it was “pretty good!” I ended up with quite a bit so I froze it in several containers to use over the next month. I used my Kitchen Aid Stand Up Mixer, Whisk attachment and whipped in on the highest the end. It’s not as thick as whipping cream, but it is pretty good. I wouldn’t sandwich it between cakes but more of a messy strawberry shortcake and pile it on the top.

      • Katie says

        Hello

        I own a raw cake business and would want to make a raw lemon tart with an Aquafaba meringue topping. I’m just wondering how the meringue would stand to bring frozen once it is spooned on to the tart? I make a weekly mixed slice box with 6 different flavours and All the boxes are delivered to customers with the slices frozen.

        Thank you
        Katie 🙂

    • Swathy sree Ravi Raj says

      Hi, I have made my first vegan whipping cream today. I used icing sugar and chickpea water that I cooked in my home. It was a success, i got stiff peaks but the creame was not stable. Maybe that’s because I didn’t add cream of tartar. Isn’t it necessary to add powered sugar?

  14. Kavita Patel says

    I have chickpea water and I tried whipping it without cream of tartar because I didn’t get it anywhere and it’s still watery After whipping for 20- 30 mins it’s not stiffing what should I do where did I go wrong with?

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Kavita, are you using homemade or from a can? We’ve only tried with canned chickpea liquid.

    • Michelle says

      Hi,
      I made this, and it whipped up great at first… but then I put it in the fridge to save it for dinner, and about half of it has gone back to being liquid. Is this normal? Do you need to make it and eat it right away, or is there a way of keeping it for longer?
      Thanks!

      • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

        Yep, it doesn’t store super well and needs to be used right away if whipped. Unwhipped it stays in the fridge for about 5 days.

    • Linda S says

      Same thing happened to me. I tried reducing the liquid but that didn’t help. Remembered reading it should be super cold so put it in the freezer for and hour. Worked a treat.

  15. Tim Irvine says

    I used the thick liquid off the bottom of some Cento ceci and some rice wine vinegar to make an excellent vinaigrette.

    • MCBCHI says

      I had great success with canned chickpea liquid buf failed with cannellini bean liquid. I think I put the sugar in too soon and not slowly enough. is there a trick to using other bean liquid?

      • Emily says

        Hiya- I’ve used canned chickpeas in brine- not the cans with salted water, I assume this is why it didn’t work. I’ve never used the cream of tartar but will give it a try! You can use it to make vegan meringues! Makes a lovely vegan mayo that goes really creamy :)

  16. Amy says

    Hi, does the salt content impact the success of using aquafaba? There are low sodium versions available and if rehydrating, you can control the salt content. Thanks

      • Bonnie says

        I am only able to find low-salt chick peas in a can; salt is part of the preservative. Salt will impact how the aquafaba whips, so I have gone to making my own from scratch with no salt. Freezes well for future use.

  17. Jami says

    Can you use the liquid from other canned beans? And will it freeze well to use for later if you don’t need all of the liquid?

  18. Sammmmmmmmm says

    Hi! I sadly do not have any mixer (I know, it’s ridic). However, I have an immersion blender, Vitamix w/ wet and dry containers and food processor. Is it possible to whip it with one of these? In the vegan mayo demo in the video, it looks like you use an immersion blender w/ normal attachment/head. Will that work? Ty!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      We haven’t tried it, but we think the immersion blender might work! Let us know how it goes!

      • Sammmmmmmmm says

        My attempt to immersion blend to meringue consistency did not work for me, LOL. I tried so many methods and ways without a mixer, but ended up having to whip (sadly) by hand. To save a life, I wanted to report back that unless making mayo, you definitely need a mixer or arm strength for days for this to whip up properly. I got a mixer now to avoid sadness in the future!

        Ty for your guidance though!!!