1-Pot Vegetable Green Curry

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Chilies, kaffir lime leaves, and basil next to a pot of green curry

This 1-pot curry is made in 30 minutes with ingredients you likely have on hand right now. Plus, the vegetable and protein options are customizable. Let us show you how it’s done!

Coconut aminos, kaffir lime leaves, lemongrass, green curry paste, coconut sugar, snow peas, mushrooms, vegetable broth, bell pepper, basil, and bamboo shoots

About Green Curry

Green curry is a popular Thai dish believed to have originated in the early 20th century (source). It’s made with green curry paste, coconut milk, veggies, and meat and/or seafood.

The flavor base (Thai green curry paste) is traditionally made from a combination of green chilies, shrimp paste, garlic, shallots, lemongrass, peppercorns, makrut limes, and cumin seeds (source). It’s spicy and flavorful and pairs perfectly with the sweetness of coconut milk.

The following is our inspired (but not traditional) plant-based take on this flavorful Thai dish. For a more authentic version of green curry (with chicken), check out this beautiful recipe from Hot Thai Kitchen.

How to Make Green Curry

To begin, add a small amount of coconut milk to a large pot (we like using a Dutch oven) and allow it to bubble and condense into a cream. The natural oil/cream released from the coconut makes it so that there’s no need for additional oil.

To the reduced coconut cream, we added green curry paste as the flavor base.

Stirring coconut milk and green curry paste in a pot as an oil-free trick

Next come mushrooms for a hearty texture and umami flavor. We like using shiitake, cremini, or button mushrooms, but other varieties will also work.

Optionally (we left it off for a lighter meal), add your favorite protein at this time (such as tempeh, shrimp, or chicken). If using tofu, we recommend using this recipe, cooking it separately, and serving on the side for best texture.

Stirring shiitake mushrooms into a coconut milk and green curry mixture

Next, we added bell peppers for natural sweetness.

More coconut milk and vegetable broth are added next, providing a rich and brothy mixture for infusing the curry flavors. We used makrut lime leaves and lemongrass, but they are optional (in case you can’t access them).

Pouring coconut milk into a pot of bell peppers, mushrooms, and green curry paste

Next, we added bamboo shoots for a quick and easy pantry-friendly vegetable. Broccoli, cabbage, or another sturdy vegetable would also work well here.

To round out the flavors, coconut aminos are added for umami flavor and coconut sugar for sweetness and to balance the subtle heat.

Dutch oven filled with our easy vegan Green Curry recipe

The mixture then simmers for 10 minutes to allow the flavors to deepen and the vegetables to soften.

For those wanting a more vibrant green color, a cup of the broth can be blended with either fresh herbs (such as basil and mint) and/or a teaspoon or two of barley grass powder. Then simply add it back to the rest of the curry.

Finally, in the last few minutes of cooking, stir in snap peas, snow peas, or green peas. They only take a couple minutes to cook and will turn a vibrant green color when ready.

Pouring barley grass powder into a pot to make a more vibrant green curry color

We hope you LOVE this green curry! It’s:

Subtly spicy
Salty
Sweet
Tangy
Rich
& Versatile!

It’s perfect on its own or over rice or quinoa as a light comfort meal. We also enjoy adding a handful of greens and garnishing with cashews for additional texture and protein.

More Thai-Inspired Curries

If you try this recipe, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it, and don’t forget to tag a photo #minimalistbaker on Instagram. Cheers, friends!

Bowl of white rice and Thai green curry next to a pot of more curry and ingredients used to make it

1-Pot Vegetable Green Curry

Incredibly delicious, 1-pot vegan green curry loaded with vegetables. Serve over rice or quinoa for the ultimate light comfort meal! Just 30 minutes required.
Author Minimalist Baker
Print
Pot and bowl of Thai Green Curry served with rice
4.89 from 9 votes
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 30 minutes
Servings 4 (Servings)
Course Entrée or Side
Cuisine Gluten-Free, Thai-Inspired, Vegan
Freezer Friendly 1 month
Does it keep? 4-5 Days

Ingredients

GREEN CURRY

  • 1/2 cup canned light coconut milk (reserve the rest of the can for adding to the curry later)
  • 5-6 Tbsp green curry paste (add more for spicier, more intense curry, less for milder curry // or sub store-bought; we like Thai Kitchen brand or Aroy-D)
  • 2 cups chopped shiitake, cremini, or button mushrooms
  • 1 large red or yellow bell pepper, sliced and halved (bite-size slices)
  • 2 14-oz cans light coconut milk (this includes the amount you used in step 1 — you need 2 14-oz cans coconut milk total as the original recipe is written)
  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • 4-5 makrut lime leaves (optional)
  • 1 stalk lemongrass, halved (optional)
  • 1 cup bamboo shoots, rinsed and drained (or other sturdy vegetable of choice such as broccoli or cabbage)
  • 1-2 Tbsp coconut aminos (or sub salt or tamari to taste)
  • 1-2 Tbsp coconut sugar, palm sugar, or maple syrup
  • 1 handful fresh basil or mint (or 1-2 tsp barley grass juice powder as original recipe is written // optional for richer color)
  • 1 cup snap peas, snow peas, or green peas

FOR SERVING optional

Instructions

  • Heat a large pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Once hot, add 1/2 cup (120 ml) coconut milk (as original recipe is written) and reserve the rest of the can for later.
  • Cook until the coconut milk is bubbling and some of the liquid has evaporated and left more of the dense cream behind. This is a technique I learned from Hot Thai Kitchen to avoid using oil since the coconut milk releases its natural oil/cream content once cooked for a few minutes. Stir occasionally and turn down heat as needed to prevent burning.
  • Next, add green curry paste and stir to combine with the coconut milk. Sauté for 2-3 minutes. Then add your mushrooms (if adding any animal protein or tempeh, do so now // if using tofu, I’d recommend cooking using this method and serving on the side of your curry for best texture). Adding your protein or mushrooms at this time allows them to infuse with the curry paste for richer flavor. Sauté for 3-4 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Next, add your bell pepper and stir to coat. I like adding bell pepper at this time to soak up some of the curry paste flavor. Then add your remaining coconut milk (total cans used should be 2 as original recipe is written) and vegetable broth. Stir to combine.
  • Next, add makrut lime leaves and lemongrass (optional to infuse more flavor), as well as your bamboo shoots and stir. Then add coconut aminos and coconut sugar or palm sugar (starting with the lesser amounts and working your way up as needed) and stir to combine. Let the broth come to a simmer, then reduce heat to low and simmer for 10 minutes, or until the flavor of the broth has become more rich and your vegetables are fork tender.
  • OPTIONAL: For a deeper green hue, scoop out ~1 cup (240 ml) of your broth and blend in a small blender (that’s safe for blending hot liquids) with a handful of fresh basil or mint and/or 1-2 tsp of barley grass juice powder. This creates a deeper green color curry and infuses a bit of earthy, floral flavor. Stir this mixture into the pot at this time (see photo).
  • Taste and adjust your broth as needed at this time, adding more salt to taste, coconut aminos for depth of flavor, or coconut sugar for sweetness. You’re looking for a rich broth with a balance of sweet, spicy, and salty. Don’t be shy with seasonings as the potency of the broth will be diluted when served with grains.
  • In the final few minutes of cooking, add your peas and stir to combine. They only need a few minutes to cook. Then turn off heat.
  • Serve as is or over grain of choice or cauliflower rice. Add tofu if serving at this time. You could also top with fresh herbs, chili peppers, lime juice, or some roasted cashews at this time (something I enjoy for more protein and texture).
  • Store cooled leftovers covered in the refrigerator up to 4-5 days, or in the freezer up to 1 month. Reheat on the stovetop over medium heat until hot.

Video

Notes

*This recipe is not a traditional Thai dish but, rather, is Thai-inspired.
*Nutrition information is a rough estimate calculated with Thai Kitchen green curry paste, homemade vegetable broth, the lesser amounts of coconut aminos and sweetener, and without optional ingredients.
*For additional protein, we like to serve this curry with greens, peas, and quinoa and garnish with cashews.
*Methods adapted from the talented Hot Thai Kitchen.

Nutrition (1 of 4 servings)

Serving: 1 serving Calories: 206 Carbohydrates: 17.6 g Protein: 2.8 g Fat: 14.6 g Saturated Fat: 11.1 g Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.2 g Monounsaturated Fat: 0.3 g Trans Fat: 0 g Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 735 mg Potassium: 270 mg Fiber: 3.2 g Sugar: 9.6 g Vitamin A: 2125 IU Vitamin C: 66.11 mg Calcium: 22.43 mg Iron: 1.03 mg

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  1. Anne says

    Love this! Made it without the extra steps to make it bright green so mine was more yellow and didn’t put all the broth in so was a little thicker. It was so delicious! Super quick and easy and unbelievably tasty.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Thanks so much for the lovely review, Emma. We are so glad you enjoyed it! Next time, would you mind leaving a rating with your review? It’s super helpful for us and other readers. Thanks so much! Xo

  2. Mary says

    Whoa! Another delicious recipe and cooking success!
    I happen to have a little makrut lime tree that a friend gave me, and this is the first time I used the leaves. They really contribute to the wonderful flavor of this curry. I didn’t have green curry paste on hand, so I used red, and I blended basil with the liquid to add back to the pot. The color was good!
    My first time commenting (sorry), and about the fiftieth time I’ve used one of your recipes. I LOVE your site. Thank you for all your hard work and all the amazing recipes and inspiration. ❤️

    • Gaby says

      Delicious curry. Will make again and again.
      I used the Thai Kitchen green curry you recommended, I think the two time I’ll probably use the entire little jar for a more strong flavor. Could I do anything to increase the spicy ness? Added some tofu at the end and served over rice. The recipe was easy to follow and the end result reminded me of my favorite curry at a local Thai restaurant I love. It gave me an opportunity to use lemongrass and a kind of mushroom I don’t usually buy. O

      • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

        Thanks for sharing, Gaby! You could add a pinch of red pepper flakes, cayenne, or finely chopped serrano for heat. Let us know if you try it!

  3. Sophie says

    Tasty, easy, and fast! Perfect week night meal. We used tempeh and cabbage in place of the bamboo. The squeeze of lime juice before serving really brightens it up nicely. I will try to get my hands on some lemongrass next time! Thank you!

  4. Simona says

    hello,

    The recipe really contains 2.4l coconut milk? It seems a lot of quantity and I am not sure if I understood correctly.
    Thank you!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Simona, sorry for the confusion! It calls for two 400 ml cans which equals 800 ml or 0.8 liters. Hope that’s more clear!

    • Nicole says

      Easy & tasty. I served the sauce over quinoa but preferred it on it’s own. I added cubed tofu at the end of the cooking process for some extra protein.

  5. Caitlin Culbertson says

    Hi, Dana! I’ve been following your blog for a while now, and have made so many amazing dishes thanks to you. I just wanted to share how impressed I am by your dedication to include sources and links to traditional recipes, and by your thoughtful replies to readers’ helpful comments on terminology. I know this is something that many food creators are struggling with, and I think you’re doing an amazing job and I applaud you! I can’t wait to try this recipe and learn more about green curry from the links you’ve provided. Thank you for doing this research and for helping me learn more about one of my favorite cuisines.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      That’s so kind! It’s definitely required a new level of awareness, but in a good way. We always aim to be learning and growing as a brand, so we embrace the changes. Thanks for the support!

  6. Stacey says

    Officially in love with green curry. I couldn’t stop sipping it while it was cooling! I’ll be serving with cauli rice & broiled crispy broccoli on the side & some tofu bites. My 1st time using lemongrass in a recipe. It’s really delicious, thank you!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Yes! We just make sure to highlight the simplicity of each dish in the title and/or the description. It signals clearly to people why it’s simple.

  7. Emily says

    I’m not an expert in this, but I believe it’s recommended to use the term makrut limes instead of kaffir limes.

    Looks like a yummy recipe! Thanks for sharing!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Emily, thanks so much for bringing this to our attention. We’re changing it right away!

      • Elizabeth says

        Great recipe, very easy to follow. I used less green chili paste because I can’t do spicy. I blended basil and spinach leaves for green color. I also added 2TBS cashew butter for a thicker, creamier sauce. Delicious! I love your recipes, this is another keeper.

  8. Melinda says

    What a great sounding recipe! I appreciate having a vegan green curry option for when I’m cooking plant only. Thank-you!

    Just want to let you know that there’s a movement to call k-limes by their actual name, makrut limes. The k-word is used as a slur in some cultures.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Melinda, thanks so much for bringing this to our attention. We’re changing it right away!

  9. Amy says

    Made it tonight with leftover rice 😁. Sprigs of mint. Romano beans, yellow pepper, chard greens and a large portabello cap. Delicious! Restaurant level good!

  10. Claire says

    Hi, I am a long time fan of your page, blog and recipes! I recently learned that the word “k*ffir” used to describe the lime leaves is offensive to many in Africa, especially in South Africa (that I have found). Other words to use could be “murkat” which I think is an Thai word for the same ingredient!

    Thanks for all the work you do!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Claire, thanks so much for your support and for bringing this to our attention. We’re changing it right away!

    • AJ says

      Thanks for sharing this recipe.

      It was a hit with my parents! Full disclosure, I used Blue Dragon – Thai Green Curry Paste. Using the coconut milk at the beginning is absolutely genius. More flavourful than simply substituting water for oil. Also, I modified the veggies as I had carrots and cauliflower I wanted to use up.

      Keep it up!

  11. Jillian says

    Hey Dana! Just wanted to say I notice and appreciate the changes you’ve made to describe a brief history of the dishes and ingredients from other cultures, with links to authentic recipes. It sets an example for other bloggers. Much love xoxo

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Thanks, Jillian! It’s been fun to learn more about other cuisines and also explore other expert cooks!