1-Bowl Snickerdoodle Cookies (Vegan + GF)

GFVGVDFNS
Jump to Recipe
GF Vegan Snickerdoodle Cookies piled on a plate next to a glass of non-dairy milk, a cinnamon stick, and cinnamon sugar coating

Do these cookies look like little pillows of cinnamon-spiked goodness coated in magical crystal dust? Oh, that’s weird, because that’s exactly what they are.

Say hello to our new favorite holiday cookie: 1-Bowl Snickerdoodle Cookies that are vegan, gluten-free, and naturally-sweetened. Let’s bake!

Assortment of ingredients for making our Vegan Gluten-Free Snickerdoodle Cookies

The base of these 1-bowl cookies — like most sugar cookies — is butter and sugar. However, we did some extensive testing with this recipe and discovered several things:

  1. Both vegan and dairy butter work well, with dairy butter yielding slightly fluffier results.
  2. Both coconut sugar and cane sugar work well, with white sugar yielding slightly crispier edges and fluffier interiors.
  3. Aquafaba, 1 small egg, and pumpkin purée all work well here (!), with aquafaba being our favorite (both in terms of flavor and texture)!
  4. Chilling the dough — even for 30 minutes — while not necessary does help yield a slightly more well-formed cookie.
  5. These cookies are seriously delicious and undetectably healthier than your average snickerdoodle.
Using egg beaters to whip the batter for our Vegan GF Snickerdoodle Cookies recipe

Once your wet ingredients have been whipped, it’s time to add your dry ingredients. For optimal texture we went with:

  1. DIY Gluten-Free Flour Blend (although we suspect all-purpose flour would work as well).
  2. Almond flour (not almond meal) for that quintessential crumb texture and subtle nutty flavor (we used our favorite store-bought brand).
  3. Cornstarch or arrowroot starch — we’ve found a little starch helps add structure, especially to cookies (something we discovered with our Vegan Gluten-Free Sugar Cookies!). Cornstarch lends a bit more fluffiness. But if avoiding corn, arrowroot makes a great replacement.
Batter of Gluten-Free Vegan Snickerdoodle Cookie dough

After a quick chill in the fridge, it’s time to roll these babies into balls. I love using this scoop to get roughly 1 ½ Tbsp amounts of dough. Then roll into balls and coat in cinnamon-sugar.

While I preferred coconut sugar as the primary sweetener for the cookies themselves, I must say organic cane sugar makes the ideal coating for getting that sparkly, crystal-like appearance and a slightly sweeter / crispier edge. So, we highly recommend it for coating / rolling!

Plate of GF Vegan Snickerdoodle Cookies with some rolled in the cinnamon sugar coating

Because vegan gluten-free cookies are structurally different than your average egg-butter-sugar-flour cookie, they sometimes need a little help in the shaping department, which is why we recommend rolling into balls and then pressing down with a glass.

This encourages them to rise a little while still getting baked through the center.

Using a glass to flatten a batch of our Gluten-Free Vegan Snickerdoodle Cookies

After a quick 10-12 minute bake in a 350 degree F (176 C) oven, they’re ready to enjoy!

Freshly baked batch of healthy Snickerdoodle Cookies on a parchment-lined baking sheet

We hope you LOVE these cookies! They’re:

Fluffy on the inside
Slightly crisp on the outside
Cinnamon-spiked
Perfectly (& naturally) sweet
Quick & easy to make
& Super delicious

These would make the perfect cookie this holiday season for snacking, evenings by the fire, or to share as gifts. While delicious on their own, they’re delightful with a cup of tea, glass of dairy-free milk (especially our DIY Oatly Barista Blend), or Chai Latte!

More Holiday Cookies

If you try this recipe, let us know! Leave a comment, rate it, and don’t forget to tag a photo #minimalistbaker on Instagram. Cheers, friends!

Stack of Gluten-Free Vegan Snickerdoodle Cookies with the top cookie missing a bite

1-Bowl Snickerdoodle Cookies (Vegan + GF)

Fluffy, naturally-sweetened snickerdoodle cookies made in 1 bowl. The perfect vegan, gluten-free cookie everyone can enjoy for the holiday season!
Author Minimalist Baker
Print
Plate of Gluten-Free Vegan Snickerdoodle Cookies made with coconut sugar
4.45 from 18 votes
Prep Time 45 minutes
Cook Time 12 minutes
Total Time 57 minutes
Servings 18 (cookies)
Course Dessert
Cuisine Gluten-Free, Vegan
Freezer Friendly 1 month
Does it keep? 3-4 Days

Ingredients

COATING

  • 2 Tbsp coconut sugar or organic cane sugar
  • 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon

COOKIES

  • 1/2 cup softened vegan butter (1/2 cup = 1 stick // or sub dairy butter if not vegan // we prefer Earth Balance, Miyoko’s*, or organic cultured dairy butter)
  • 1/2 cup coconut sugar or organic cane sugar (sub up to half the sugar w/ stevia*)
  • 3 Tbsp aquafaba (liquid from a can of chickpeas // not whipped), or 3 Tbsp (45 g) pumpkin purée*, or 1 small chicken egg (we liked aquafaba best)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3/4 tsp baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp cream of tartar (optional adds tanginess — if you don’t have, omit)
  • 1 ¼ tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • 1 ⅓ cups gluten-free flour blend* (if not gluten-free, sub all purpose flour but use less as it's drier and more absorbent*)
  • 1 ¼ cup almond flour (not almond meal)
  • 2 Tbsp cornstarch or arrowroot starch (cornstarch yields slightly fluffier texture)

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (176 C) and line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Set aside.
  • Prepare the coating for later by adding coconut sugar or organic cane sugar and cinnamon to a small bowl and mixing to combine. Set aside.
  • Add softened butter of choice to a large mixing bowl and beat until creamy and smooth — about 1 minute.
  • Add sugar of choice and mix on medium speed until fluffy and light — about 1 minute. Then add chickpea brine (aquafaba, or other egg substitute) and vanilla and mix again, scraping down sides as needed.
  • Add baking powder, cream of tartar (optional), ground cinnamon, and sea salt, and blend to combine. Then add gluten-free flour blend, almond flour, and cornstarch or arrowroot and stir with a wooden spoon until the ingredients are combined.
  • The dough should be thick and almost difficult to mix at this point. If too soft, add 1 Tbsp gluten-free flour blend and almond flour at a time until a thick, moldable dough is formed. Then cover and transfer dough to the refrigerator. Optional: Chill dough for 30 minutes, which helps yield a slightly more well-formed cookie (we tested it both ways and both work well).
  • Use a cookie scooper (like this one) or Tablespoon to measure out 1 ½ Tbsp amounts of dough to gently roll into balls. The dough will still be soft, so be gentle. Roll in the cinnamon-sugar topping and arrange on the parchment-lined baking sheets. Press down gently with the palm of your hand or a glass to smash slightly.
  • Bake for 10-12 minutes, or until slightly golden brown and expanded (some cracks are normal — they won't expand a ton). Remove from the oven and let cool on a baking sheet for 10 minutes. Then enjoy!
  • Once cooled, store leftover cookies covered at room temperature for 3-4 days, or in the freezer up to 1 month.

Notes

*1 package of Miyokos is equivalent to 2 sticks of butter. If using Miyokos, use 1/2 package (as original recipe is written // adjust if altering batch size).
*If cutting back on sugar with stevia, this will make the cookies softer, so you will likely need to add more gluten-free flour, almond flour, and/or cornstarch to help thicken the dough — adjust as needed.
*We tried testing this recipe with aquafaba, pumpkin purée, and an egg and much preferred the aquafaba. Although an egg and pumpkin purée did work, just didn’t produce as good of texture / flavor!
*Cream of tartar provides the snickerdoodle cookies with that quintessential tanginess. However, it is not an essential ingredient in this recipe.
*We tested this recipe with our DIY gluten-free flour blend and can’t guarantee the results of other store-bought or homemade mixes.
*If not gluten-free, you can try subbing the gluten-free flour blend with unbleached all-purpose flour, but we haven’t tested it this way and can’t guarantee good results. We would recommend adding less as it’s drier and more absorbent.
*You can make the cookie dough ahead of time and refrigerate up to 2-3 days in advance. Simply let the dough rest at room temperature for 30 minutes before scooping and baking. It should be soft and moldable.

Nutrition (1 of 18 servings)

Serving: 1 cookies Calories: 158 Carbohydrates: 18.8 g Protein: 2.3 g Fat: 8.5 g Saturated Fat: 3.9 g Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.94 g Monounsaturated Fat: 2.48 g Trans Fat: 0 g Cholesterol: 0 mg Sodium: 86 mg Potassium: 66 mg Fiber: 1.4 g Sugar: 7.1 g Vitamin A: 0 IU Vitamin C: 0 mg Calcium: 34 mg Iron: 0.42 mg

Did You Make This Recipe?

Tag @minimalistbaker on Instagram and hashtag it #minimalistbaker so we can see all the deliciousness!

If you love this recipe...

Get Our Fan Favorites eBook Here!

Reader Interactions

Leave a Comment & Rating!

Have a question? Use ctrl+f or ⌘+f on your computer or the "find on page" function on your phone browser to search existing comments! Need help? Check out this tutorial!

My Rating:




  1. Nicol says

    So good they’re dangerous!! I made this the first time with a combination of coconut flour/tapioca/etc since I didn’t have almond flour. They came out very dry, but I’m assuming this is due to the coconut flour. Second was with almond flour and I’m so happy I gave it another try.

  2. Nishita says

    Awesome recipe! I made these and the cookies turned out so fluffy and delicious! I didn’t have have gluten free flour so used AP flour instead (1 cup instead of the 1 1/3 cup listed) – I didn’t have any issues with the flour being too dry. Love your recipes!

  3. Emily says

    These were delicious! Thank you 💜 Your site has been my go to for years now and I’ve yet to have a recipe disappoint. Mine seemed a little dry so I added a touch more aquafaba just in case. It’s probably because I made my own almond flour though..always turns out slightly thicker than store bought.

  4. Danielle says

    We made this recipe, omitting the almond flour because we didn’t have it in our pantry and supermarkets are closed today. We chose not to replace the almond flour with the gluten free flour we used for the base.

    Using the oven at 180-ish Celsius (the dial only shows multiples of 20) after 12 minutes, the cookies did not look golden brown. We baked the cookies for another 17 minutes at 180-ish Celsius and they finally came out golden brown.

    Overall, very tasty cookies. I think we’ll make this recipe again during the holiday season :)

  5. Lo says

    Made a couple adjustments: added 3TBSP of flax egg goop as egg, added 1/4TSP almond extract, used cornstarch and 1/1 GF flour, baked for 12 min exactly and they are DANG GOOD. Great recipe!

  6. Tyler says

    These are so soft and light! I made this once as written (wonderful), and again with only all-purpose flour (I didn’t have almond flour on hand). For those considering using only all-purpose flour, you’ll need to experiment with adding more liquid. When I one-to-one subbed the almond flour with all-purpose, the cookies were a crumbly, dry, dense mess. The recipe as written is best (obviously)!

    • KA says

      I just made these by substituting all-purpose flour and they also turned out a dry, crumbly mess. I recommend removing that you can substitute all-purpose flour in the description, above. I’ll make these again later, as written!

  7. Lauren says

    Made these cookies for my sister who is testing out the vegan lifestyle. Easy to make. My sister loved the cookies, but had one suggestion: some sort of frosting for the top. They were perfectly fluffy, but a different texture on top would have balanced it perfect. Great option for gluten free eaters.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Thanks so much for the lovely review, Lauren. We are so glad she enjoyed them! Next time, would you mind leaving a rating with your review? It’s super helpful for us and other readers. Thanks so much! Xo

  8. K M Wilcox says

    I made these cookies today. Followed the recipe exactly. The dough was quite dry and would barely hold together. I had used aquafaba and had to add an additional teaspoon to get dough to form ball. During baking the cookies never did get brown but don’t overbalanced trying to get the brown. I did that with the first tray and it just dried them out. With the cinnamon topping if the browning does not happen it is not missed!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi there! Definitely don’t exceed the bake time. They won’t look done but they are. They puff up and and the edges crack!

  9. Mary E. says

    I just made these yummy cookies. Very light, but big on flavor. I do not enjoy baking, but these cookies were easy to make and I LOVE that you add so many variations and notes. I have recommended your pumpkin bars to several people and will do so with the snickerdoodles. I never comment on recipes, but I loved them so much I wanted to give the recipe 5 stars! Thank you for all your testing with different ingredients and options to substitute. It is so helpful.

  10. Tina says

    Just made these using the chickpea liquid, then all other recommended ingredients and I’m debating ditching the batch. They have a bitter smell, taste and are very dry (I took them out at the 10 minute mark). Not sure where things went wrong as I purchased the flours fresh for this recipe??

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      So sorry to hear that was your experience, Tina! Would you mind sharing which gluten-free flour blend you used? If it had bean flours that could make it bitter. Or if it has coconut flour, that could make it dry.

  11. Alex says

    These turned out great after a little bit of trial and error.
    On my first try I ended up with overly dry hockey pucks of crumbly awfulness instead of delicious cookies. From reading through the other reviews, I’m not the only one who ran into this problem. I did manage to figure it out and mostly fix it though. On my second try I got it pretty close to spot on, the key was to add the flour incrementally. I started with half of the flour the recipe called for and slowly added more until it got difficult to stir. I ended up using about 2/3rds of the listed amount of flour and got to what I thought was the right place. After baking and cooling it’s clear I undershot the amount of flour by a little as some cookies were too soft to get off the parchment paper in once piece, but it was worlds closer to correct than my first attempt and resulted in actually really good cookies. I think with more practice and more tries I should be able to get the consistency figured out to reliably make these cookies, though it’s odds the flour amount seems to vary so much from what’s listed.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Thanks for sharing your experience, Alex! We’ll revisit the recipe and see if there are modifications to be made.

  12. sandra forte says

    Wow I’ve never heard of Snickerdoodle biscuits in Australia…..but after tasting these babies I’m sold!!
    They are everything you described and more
    Thank you Dana….you have made cooking an addiction for me again…only now vegan.

  13. Hannah says

    I am so excited about making these but I have an allergy to tree nuts. What would you suggest substituting for the almond flour?

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Hannah, if not gluten-free we’re thinking unbleached all purpose flour would be the best alternative. Although, we haven’t tried it and aren’t certain! Let us know what you find out!

  14. Theresa says

    These are some of the best snickerdoodle cookies I’ve ever had! You can’t even tell that they’re vegan and gluten free. I’ll definitely be making these again!

  15. helena says

    I made these cookies today. All the members of our family loved them, except myself. I find them a bit dry and a tiny bit bitter. I substituted the almond flour (severe allergy to almonds) with chestnut flour (1:1). I guess 1:1 was not the best proportion, as the cookies were a bit bitter. I shall try this recipe again and jongle with the proportions of chestnut and wheat flour. The taste however is amazingly close to Enjoy Life’s snickerdoodles (those fancy and expensive allergy-friendly cookies). I am not adding a rating, as I am still looking to finding the best substitution to almond flour.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hi Anna, we didn’t test it, but coconut oil might work. Just make sure it’s softened (not liquid)! Let us know how it goes!

  16. Donna says

    I made the snickerdoodles. They were easy and delicious! I will be making them again this season. Especially glad the recipe includes a truvia substitute as I need to watch my sugar.

    Question could I substitute all purpose flour for the almond flour? Almond flour is so expensive.

  17. Kelsi says

    Easy and yummy recipe! My modifications were using flax eggs (1 tbsp ground flax to 3 tbsp water, do 3 and let sit 10 min) whole wheat flour, and organic sucanat sugar inside. I also added a tsp of almond extract.

    The end result was moist, nutty, and perfect with vanilla almond milk!

    Thanks for getting me into the holiday spirit!

  18. Anita says

    Delicious! I made it with dairy butter, Aquafaba and regular flour. They are really nice and have a lovely crunch on the outside! I don’t have white sugar at home, so rolled them on cinnamon and brown sugar. Will definitely be making them again!! And I might add some mixed spice or even ginger for a bit of a kick… Thanks, Dana. First time posting, but long time follower!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Thanks for sharing, Anita! Next time would you mind adding a rating to your review? It’s super helpful to us and other readers! xo

  19. Kelly says

    I used butter and an egg. I made some substitutions based off the reviews, saying the recipe was dry. I only did 1/2c Gf flour blend, (I used bobs 1:1), I was nervous using bob’s because in the past it hasn’t yielded me good results. So instead I did 1/3c arrowroot starch, which has given me good results in the past. I did a test cookie for 11 mins, let it cool, then tried it. I decided 11 was too long (even though they didn’t look done), but it dried out and wasn’t soft enough for my liking. I baked my full batch for 9-10 mins. They come out pale but after letting them cool they were great.

  20. Robyn says

    hi! i made the cookies yesterday and they turned out quite different from what the recipe and i wanted haha

    the dough was not too soft but quite crumbly and they took way longer to bake because they seemed not yet done – about 20 to 25 minutes :0 after baking they were reaaaally hard, lookied like bread and were soft only on the innermost spot. where did the baking go wrong? probably when the dough wass crumply but why? i used an egg, all purpose flour, butter, and the rest as in the vegan recipe.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hmm, interesting. If you used an egg and all purpose I haven’t tested it that way but it shouldn’t have been too different than my version. I’m wondering if you just overbaked them. Like, they wont’ look “done” at the 10-12 minute mark, but they are. They continue to cook / harden when cooling. Perhaps that was why?

      • Robyn says

        this could veeeery very well be why…i will try to do them again with no extreme baking time haha!

        thank you very much!

  21. Nicole says

    I made this today and it turned out great! For people living in Germany, I used half Rewe Free-from Flour and half Bauckhof Universal Mehlmix for the gluten-free flour. It worked out really well!

  22. Hanusia says

    This was the perfect recipe to come across today as I needed some gluten-free goodies for upcoming events. As always, Minimalist Baker is the best! I made them as directed, vegan-style, and they turned out soft, fluffy, and delicious.

  23. Sandy says

    What can I use as a substitute to the almond flour? There are nut allergies in the family gluten is not a problem.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      I’m thinking unbleached all purpose flour? Although, we haven’t tried it and I’m not sure! Let us know what you find out!

  24. Karine says

    Hello!

    Did substitute the vegan butter (which I did not have) by half regular butter and half coconut oil (unflavoured).

    Loved rolling these beautiful and non-sticky little cookie balls with my six years old daughter! We are testing recipes for Santa this month! ;)

    Dana, once again you hit the bull’s eye with this recipe!

  25. Sanna says

    I tried this recipe today and did not make it vegan or gluten-free. When they were ready to take out of the oven I thought they didn’t look the same as in the photo above. I think they were a bit too sweet but had a very nice consistency: crispy on the outside and soft on the inside. It was not before an hour later that I realized I had forgotten to put in the almond flour in the dough. So I can guarantee very nice cookies even with modifications to the recipe.

  26. Danielle says

    I had to add a splash of water but that’s probably just because of the brand of gfree flour I used, the recipe was so yummy! We enjoyed them this morning with coffee. So quick and easy to make!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Um, we haven’t tried that but I fear they won’t be as fluffy. Let us know if you give it a try!

  27. Emilie says

    Hello Dana, this looks amazing! Any thoughts on using coco flour instead of Almond Flour? Thank you! Greetings from Paris

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Generally coconut flour doesn’t yield a great consistency in our experience and it’s more absorbent, which tends to dry things out. But if you try it, start with half the amount called for and work your way up from there! Let us know if you give it a go. You could also try subbing almond meal (ground almonds) vs. almond flour.

  28. Kate says

    Hi Dana, just a general comment. If cooking with chickpeas can you reserve and save the aquafaba to use at a later date. If so how would you store it and for how long would it keep? Thanks x

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      I would freeze it into ice cubes and it’ll keep for a month! Completely thaw to room temperature before using.

  29. Jen Lumish says

    These cookies look amazing. My husband is allergic to almonds. Could I substitute the almond flour for something else?
    Thanks so much!

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hmm, that’s tough. I’m thinking your best bet would be a combination of more gluten-free flour, oat flour, and perhaps cassava?

  30. Gaby says

    You literally read my mind!! I’ve wanted to make snickerdoodles for awhile now and I didn’t see you had one on your blog till you posted today!! Will definitely be making these later this week ?

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Hmm, that’s tough. I’d say your best bet would be substituting the almond flour with a blend of more GF flour, oat flour, and maybe cassava flour? Let us know if you give it a try!

  31. Jaclyn says

    Is there a decent alternative to almond flour for those allergic to tree nuts? (Specifically almonds, walnuts, and pecans).

  32. Danielle says

    I just made these as we were putting the ornaments on our tree! I didn’t have the correct amount of flour so I had to substitute in 1/3 cup of whole wheat. I used an egg, and regular sugar and all purpose flour (and that bit of whole wheat.. lol) They turned out great!!! but needed about 7 minutes more than suggested in the oven. My husband loved them too! Thanks for the perfect cookie recipe for this evening.

  33. Neerali Parag says

    Hi Dana can you substitute coconut oil for the fat? We don’t get Earth balance or Miyokos here. And I really don’t like the other Vegan butter.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      I don’t think we tested it that way, but I think that should work. Just make sure it’s softened (not liquid)! Let us know how it goes!

    • Caitlin says

      Mine is the same, and I did add both the vegan butter and aquafaba. Put it in the fridge and hoping for some magic but I can’t form a ball with the powder yet

      • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

        So strange! Did you add the correct measurement of butter. Seems strange. Otherwise, perhaps try adding more aquafaba or some dairy-free milk to add moisture back in?

        • Cassie says

          Mine turned out the same way – almost like powder. Looking back and scouring the recipe, I believe it’s because I added 3tbsp of *whipped* aquafaba and when watching the video, it seems to be just the liquid, not whipped. Is that the case? If so, I’m guessing that’s where my missing liquid is from!

          • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerSupport @ Minimalist Baker says

            Ah! Yes- that is definitely the discrepancy then. This recipe uses unwhipped aquafaba. Good catch! We’ll make a note to make that more clear.

  34. Katherine Q. says

    I know you explained why you wouldn’t only be posting vegan recipes anymore, but I’m disappointed that you’ve started suggesting using eggs and dairy butter in recipes that you’ve marked vegan. I’ve been a fan for years, and you were one of the first vegan recipe blogs I ever subscribed to. I decided to stay subscribed when you first announced the change earlier this year, since you were very understanding of everyone’s feelings and offered the option to subscribe to only vegan recipes. But I don’t know if I’ll stay a subscriber now. When I’m looking over a new recipe and deciding whether or not to try it, seeing “chicken egg” on the list of ingredients can be enough to put me off the entire thing.

    Beyond that, there’s also a readability issue. I understand the impulse to avoid posting duplicate recipes, one vegan and one not. However, the number of suggested substitutions and parentheticals here makes the recipe a little crowded and harder to reference while baking.

    I hope you’ll consider omitting animal products as suggested substitutions on the recipes you tag “vegan” moving forward. You consistently make and share some of the best-tasting recipes I’ve ever tried, and I would miss seeing new ones in my inbox. Whatever decision you make, I’ll understand. I just wanted to let you know how these substitutions might turn off some readers from otherwise great recipes. Many thanks for the years of delicious work you’ve shared.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      Thanks for the kind feedback, Katherine. I don’t think we’ll do duplicate recipes in the future. But we’ll see if we can consolidate the notes in an easier to read fashion. Sincerely appreciate your support.

      • Heidi says

        I personally love that you give options!
        I work with high school students and it’s nice to show them how you can adapt and substitute ingredients in a recipe!
        Please keep it up!

        • helena says

          Besides the great recipes, one of the reasons I love MB are the notes. The more notes, the better. We are a very diverse family with diverse preferences and restrictions: one with food allergies, one keto eater, one big meat-butter-egg lover and one healthy eater. Notes are essential when cooking the same recipe, multiple timpes, for different eaters in the same family.

    • Avatar for Dana @ Minimalist BakerDana @ Minimalist Baker says

      For this recipe I’m thinking a blend of GF flour, oat flour, and cassava flour? We haven’t tried coconut but that’s another option.